July 17, 2010

In Cervisia Veritas

Back when I was in school, this amusing thing used to circulate making a distinction between theologians--and therefore the theologies that derived from them--who drink beer and those who drink Scotch. I don't remember how enlightening it was, but debemus distinguere, after all.

Now I wouldn't claim to be a theologian. But this morning, as I take advantage of the least hot part of the day to pack my own theological books into the car, it becomes abundantly clear into which category I would fall.




And for those who question whether it's good to drink beer at all, go ahead and check out what St. Thomas had to say on the subject.

11 comments:

GrandmaK said...

Enlightening! Cathy

Rachel Gray said...

At work there's a yeast called saccharomyces cerevisiae that people do research on. I understood the name when I realized that cervisia is the Latin for beer.

Your title also reminded me of Samuel Johnson's retort when someone used the in vino veritas argument: "Why, sir, that may be an argument for drinking, if you suppose men in general to be liars. But, sir, I would not keep company with a fellow, who lies as long as he is sober, and whom you must make drunk before you can get a word of truth out of him."

Ad Abolendam said...

Awesome Thomas parody. The writer even managed to imitate the rigid style of the English Dominicans translation.

Brother Charles said...

The writer is from a Dominican parish. :)

ben in denver said...

Fr. Charles,

Scotch Whiskey was developed over the long course of the middle ages in Scottish monasteries. Therefore I would immagine that those theolgians with an affinity for benedictine spirituality would have the most "spiritual" unity with Scotch, and that slightly superior beverage, Irish Whiskey, which has the virtue in modern times of being distilled by actual Catholics.

Further, we know for certain that the Minims Friars of Munich began preparing Salvatore double boch as early as 1634 for their Lenten fast. The great superiority of this fine lager, which may still be tasted today thanks to the fine people at Paulaner, is convincing testimony that beer is clearly the the favored "spirit" of franciscan theology.

I don't even think I have to go into how it is that we know those Domnincans are all a bunch of winos!

Brother Charles said...

Love it

Lee Strong said...

I'm Scottish, but I have been known to sing "In Heaven there is no beer, that's why we drink it here." :-)

Elizabeth Mahlou said...

Great parody. Talented writer.

Adoro said...

You know, Father, a couple years ago I discovered some commentary by St. Thomas Aquinas on the topic of beer as well:

http://adorotedevote.blogspot.com/2008/07/beer-and-st-thomas-aquinas.html

It was, of course, found with the "Q" document.....

;-)

Brother Charles said...

Adoro: Love it.

Caedmon said...

As an alcoholic whose drinking has gotten him into serious trouble, I no longer drink either intoxicating beverage. However, the choice to abstain is not a negation of preference. Beer was for getting drunk; scotch was for enjoying. Therefore, as I transitioned from my early days as a lush to a more moderate position of tipsy theologian, scotch was potable of choice.